RENDEZ-VOUS

12/06 > 31/07 2021
Exhibition view
Exhibition view
Exhibition view
Exhibition view
Exhibition view




Weaving has fostered exchange—in the image of intertwining thread—using the same tools, practices, and movements since time immemorial, opening the door to new forms of socialization. As the pandemic begins to unwind, Marie Hazard calls us to the Galerie Mitterrand, inviting us to meet people, colours, shapes, and materials. Thus, the artist wanted the invitation card to be a summons, but also a medium through which everyone could express their individual ideas on notions of gathering and sharing. Indeed, visitors are encouraged to complete the invitation card by answering the question, “What does rendez-vous mean to you?”. They can then place their card into an urn at the entrance to the gallery. To introduce her working method to the public, Marie Hazard has set up her loom in the gallery, where she will create monochromatic weaves (like blank pages of a book), onto which the responses returned on the invitations will be printed at the end of the exhibition.

Both simple and complex, weaving entails intense manual labour, whereas similar results could be achieved through automation. The idea of manual weaving, then, is representative of a certain irrationality, anti-capitalism, or at least a form of backwardness when it comes to notions of productivity. From this point of view, manual weaving exists as a testament to the failures of technological progress. The craft is a simple act that manifests our imagination by stitching our gestures into space and time. Yet it is also an expression of the artist’s personal innovation: she adds another dimension by printing words and phrases onto the woven thread.


Though the art of weaving itself goes back five thousand years, the tools used—mainly wooden—have evolved over the centuries. The process, originally a craft principally done by women, has since become industrialized and mechanized. Hazard’s approach reminds us that from the 19th century onwards, the Arts and Crafts movement in England advocated the development of craft techniques that were adapted to our natural capabilities. Hazard uses simple materials: woven paper, polyester, and linen. She first begins with some initial sketches, using coloured pastels or pencils. An element of the unknown or undefined is crucial to her process: Hazard leaves room for surprises, for mishaps—in other words, for chance.


Hazard’s weavings are an extension of material in space, but also a transformation of this space into something dynamic and alive. Blended, mixed, dispersed, and shimmering colours; threads which intertwine, neutralize each other, and clash; the results are tactile, fluid, manifestations of materiality, reflecting their tools: light, dense, spontaneous, geometric, or, on the contrary, chaotic and sensual. The exhibition includes a video showing the artist at work, tracing the different stages of a weaving from conception to printing.


The works showcased in the Galerie Mitterrand were inspired by Roland Barthes’ Fragments d’un discours amoureux. Working intuitively with his words, and “deciphering” the fragments, the artist seeks to “weave perceptions”. Marie Hazard prints paintings, words, and fragments of poems on her weavings. The letters blur the semantic representation of the words and the inherently abstract appearance of the woven material. Most of the works featured in the exhibition are approximately the size of a coffee table book you might enjoy perusing. However, these pieces remain open books: they are works in progress, and no one can say how close—or far—they are from completion.


Fragments are the figurative thread of this exhibition. To quote the artist: “What I like about fragments is that they have no defined duration; you can experience them over a certain moment of time. You don’t know when this moment will end or when the next one will begin. For me, each fragment is a unique moment in itself.”


Olivier Berggruen, 2021